Lincoln County Logging Company 1925-1939
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In 1925 Charles H. Davis Jr. established the Lincoln County Logging Company to log a tract of timber he owned along
the Siletz River. Logging operations consisted of cutting the logs, dragging them to the Siletz River, and then making
them into rafts to be towed downriver and out to sea. In 1927 Albert S. Kerry, one of the major stockholders,
persuaded Davis to allow his brother Almon A. Kerry to take charge of the company. Under Almon's direction, the
company began laying track up Roots Creek, with a log dump near the mouth of the creek on the Siletz River. Camp
was on a giant barge that had been owned by the Manary Logging Company called the Ark. Davis had used this during
his operations moving the Ark along the river as needed for logging. In 1939 operations along the line ended as all of
Davis' lands had been logged over. Today as one visits this area, there are stands of more recently planted third
growth, as well as the towering giants of second growth over them.
Log Dump:
Mainline:
First Spur:
Second Spur:
I don't know exactly what this canister was used for, possibly as an filter, but it
was lying next to the donkey sled.(01/02/12)
This rail plate for a switch was found at the donkey sled.(01/02/12)
The pictures below are of a donkey sled that was found on the creek side of the grade where several skid roads came down to the landing location. This landing was about 2/3
down the mainline towards the end. By the time we reached here, we had had enough of the rain and 50mph winds. So, we turned around and headed out.(01/02/12)
Looking up the grade past the second trestle after the grade crosses to the south side of Roots Creek.
The landing shown below is about where the toe of the knob on the left is.(01/02/12)
Looking N across the 2nd trestle past the crossing of Roots Creek. There was nothing left of this
trestle.(01/02/12)
Looking up the grade at a throughcut approximately 700 feet past the end of the 1st trestle after the
crossing of Roots Creek.(01/02/12)
Looking roughly NNE at the grade in a more recent clearcut. This is approximately 1200 feet past the
crossing of Roots Creek.(01/02/12)
Trestle cap spike found at the end of the first trestle past the Roots Creek crossing.(01/02/12)
Remains of an old barrel near the end of the first trestle past the crossing of Roots Creek.(01/02/12)
Trestle cap spike and debris of first trestle after the crossing of Roots Creek.(01/02/12)
Lloyd Palmer lining up for a picture of the stringers of the first trestle past the Roots Creek
crossing.(01/02/12)
Cross member pin of the first trestle after the crossing of Roots Creek.(01/02/12)
Fallen stringers of the first bridge after the crossing of Roots Creek, about 700 feet up the grade. This
trestle spanned two small creeks. Just past it, the grade exited the 25 year old reprod and entered a
fresher clearcut.(01/02/12)
Tie striations, just to the left of the trail. This is about a hundred feet before the first trestle past the
crossing of Roots Creek.(01/02/12)
Spike found in the grade, about 500 feet past the crossing of Roots Creek.(01/02/12)
A collection of bolts found along the grade about 300 feet past the crossing of Roots
Creek.(01/02/12)
Lloyd Palmer starting up the grade just past the crossing of Roots Creek. It should be noted that there are no pictures of the trestle that spanned Roots Creek because there are no remains that we
could find. Also, for the 1,000 feet that the grade ran on the NW side of Roots Creek from the road to the creek crossing, there are no pictures since this is nothing but 12ft tall salmonberry and with Josh
and Lloyd cutting a trail through it, you still could not see anything.(01/02/12)
This is looking west at the throughcut where the second spur takes off to the north from the grade. It is the patch
of grass at the extreme right of the photo.(01/02/12)
Looking east at a previous throughcut. This is where the 4405 road takes off, just past the first spur.(01/02/12)
Lloyd Palmer and Josh Herzberg joking around on the second spur just after it took off from the 4400 Line.(01/02/12)
Josh Herzberg and the first throughcut about 300 feet up the grade past the mainline.(01/02/12)
Josh Herzberg and Lloyd Palmer looking up the grade at the second throughcut. The first trestle ended behind
them with no remains that could be found. This is about 1,200 feet up the grade from the mainline.(01/02/12)
Looking SW at Lloyd Palmer at the beginning of the second trestle, while standing at the end of it. This was the last
trestle and was about 1,300 feet from the 4400 Line. There was nothing left of this trestle as well.(01/02/12)
Looking up the grade, through the salmonberry, at the older timber that the grade ran into.(01/02/12)
The second spur took off to the NE from the 4400 Road about 4,300 feet from the start of the road. It had two trestles across two draws. At the end of the second trestle, the grade made a sweeping 90 degree turn to
the NW to avoid crossing the main creek. It ran for about another 600 feet past the second trestle before ending on the top of a small ridge line.